The Standard Knife Collector’s Guide 6th Edition

Knife Collector's GuideThis Knife Collector’s Guide book lists literally hundreds of manufacturers of cutlery from all over the world. Old as well as new brands are included. The easy-to-use format allows the collector to become an expert in evaluating or appraising knives by using the RBR evaluation scales. There are overviews describing the histories of major knife companies, a section on commemoratives and limited editions, clubs and organizations, numbering systems, and a section on identifying knife patterns.

 

Knife Collector’s Guide

The handle materials section contains full-color photographs showcasing the variety of handle materials used in the manufacture of knives. This book is a must for the experienced as well as the new knife collector. A thorough pricing update and an expansion of the RBR scales are highlights of this sixth edition. 2009 values.

Click Here For More Information

Save

Review

Excellent overview and a great place to start Positives: Comprehensive overview of the various manufacturers. Good valuation system that gives direction on which brands are more desirable. Decent discussion of knife care. Good glossy color insert.Cons: Does not discuss the history of various patterns(Stockman,Trapper, etc.), but this seems beyond the scope of the book (find an old copy of Bernard Levine’s Guide to Knives…either the 3rd or 4th edition). A general overview of patterns and their intended use would be nice.This book will get you headed in the right direction of knife collecting. This combined with the Bernard Levine book mentioned above is all you need unless you specialize in a brand. There are Case, Cattaraugus, etc… specific books. As to some other comments, I guess I knew this didn’t cover fixed blade knives, but I guess it should be “The Standard Pocket Knife Collector’s Guide.”

Please follow and like us:

3 Replies to “The Standard Knife Collector’s Guide 6th Edition”

  1. Useful, but still disappointing The strong suit of this book is the section recounting the histories of dozens of knife manufacturers, as well as the six appendixes, which give detailed identification information and price guidance for Buck Creek, Case, Cattaraugus, Robeson, Remington, Taylor, and Winchester.

  2. Waste of money Other than proposing to be a knife price guide, this book has no information about knives, other than a very cursory overview, for someone who knows absolutely nothing about knives. The book fails miserably in its attempt to be an informative price guide. The concockted mathematical formula for determining a knife’s value is devoid of reality. In the case of certain brands, such as “Case” and “Cattaraugus”, the values are so far below real world values that the book is almost entertaining as a jest. Someone who wants to learn about knives and gain a feel for their values would best be served by getting a copy of Levine’s 4th Edition. I wish I had read my own review before I purchased this book.

  3. Excellent overview and a great place to start Positives: Comprehensive overview of the various manufacturers. Good valuation system that gives direction on which brands are more desirable. Decent discussion of knife care. Good glossy color insert.Cons: Does not discuss the history of various patterns(Stockman,Trapper, etc.), but this seems beyond the scope of the book (find an old copy of Bernard Levine’s Guide to Knives…either the 3rd or 4th edition). A general overview of patterns and their intended use would be nice.This book will get you headed in the right direction of knife collecting. This combined with the Bernard Levine book mentioned above is all you need unless you specialize in a brand. There are Case, Cattaraugus, etc… specific books. As to some other comments, I guess I knew this didn’t cover fixed blade knives, but I guess it should be “The Standard Pocket Knife Collector’s Guide.”

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: